Objectives

  

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Learning Outcomes

Objectives

The study of Applied Sciences and Engineering involves a bachelor training of 180 credits followed by a master training of 120 credits. The bachelor degree gives access to the master that leads to the title of Engineer in Applied Sciences. The bachelor degree also gives access to the masters in engineering at other universities, both domestic and foreign.


The main objective of the Bachelor in Applied Sciences and Engineering at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel is to provide the students with a broad, polyvalent scientific and technological basis, allowing them to start the Master in Applied Sciences and Engineering with a specialization of their choice. The final objective of the complete study is to form Engineers in Applied Sciences who have a multidiscplinary technical knowledge combined with a thorough and scientifically based knowledge in their specialization.


To obtain this objective, the concept of a broad bachelor training was developed with four possible specializations (one of which has to be chosen at the beginning of the third year), i.e. civil construction, chemistry and materials, electronics and computer sciences, and electro-mechanical engineering. As such, the students receive the required basic knowledge in the main fields of Engineering through the broad common core of the training, and also get a fundamental basis in the chosen specialization through a series of specific courses.


In addition to providing knowledge, a further aim is to deliver a set of skills (communication, research, problem solving, teamwork, ) and attitudes (life long learning, attention for ethical, social and economic aspects, environmental awareness,.) that are of great importance  for the following master training and professional career.

Final Objectives

A degree of Bachelor in Applied Sciences and Engineering implies knowledge and insights in mathematics, physics, chemistry, mechanics, electronics, computer science and electricity, and in the related more technologically oriented disciplines of materials science, mass and heat transfer, hydrodynamics and electro-mechanical engineering.


Further, being able to implement the acquired knowledge and insights to solve theoretical, experimental and technological problems is very important. In this, the formulation of definitions, the use of dimension analysis, having spatial insight, possessing measuring and experimental skills, performing error analysis, using computer tools and being able to program, and using numerical methods are essential.


Also finding new information and being able to assimilate it and integrate it with prior knowledge in order to form a nuanced opinion (taking into account ethical, social and economic aspects, environment ) are required competences. The student must also be able to do this in a team and must possess the communication skills to express and convey ideas and results.


Additional, specific competences for the four specialization areas are the following:


Civil construction


The specific competences are (1) having basic knowledge in construction physics, construction technology, design methodology and geology, (2) having knowledge and insights in elasticity, strength and stability, hydraulics, ground mechanics and building materials, and (3) being able to use analysis and calculation methods to design simple civil constructions.


Chemistry and Materials


The specific competences are (1) having basic knowledge in chemistry and materials, (2) having basic knowledge in process technology (unit operations, safety and environment), (3) possessing skills to integrate related disciplines into chemical and materials process technology, and (4) having insight in the link between the chemical build-up of a material and its properties.

Electronics and Computer sciences


Electronics and Computer sciences (generic)


The specific competences are (1) having basic knowledge in electromagnetism, (2) having extensive knowledge in electronic circuits, networks and filters, and (3) having knowledge and insights in quantum physics and the operation of electronic and photonic components.


Electronics and Computer sciences (profile computer sciences)


The specific competences are (1) having knowledge and insights in algorithms and data structures, object oriented programming and software engineering, and (2) having basic knowledge of data banks and artificial intelligence.

Electro-mechanical engineering


The specific competences are (1) having basic knowledge about the operation and use of machines and machine components (thermal, electrical and mechanical machines), (2) having knowledge and insights in elasticity, strength and stability, flow mechanics, kinetics and dynamics of machines, (3) having knowledge and insights in (industrial) measuring methods and control, electrical circuits, electro-technique, and (4) having knowledge and insights in the principles of energy production.

These end competences are in line with the Dublin descriptors for a qualitative bachelor as set out by the  Joint Quality Initiative  (www.jointquality.org).

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Academic plans

In the context of this programme, the following academic plans are offered:

Chemistry and Materials
Civil Engineering
Electronics and Information Technology
Electronics and Information Technology Profile Profile Computer Science
Initial track
Mechanical and Electrotechnical Engineering
Abridged Chemistry and Materials after Previous Training Bio-engineer
Abridged Chemistry and Materials after Previous Training Chemistry
Abridged Chemistry and Materials after Previous Training IWT
Abridged Civil Engineering after Previous Training IWT
Abridged Electronics and Information Technology after Previous Training IWT
Abridged Mechanical and Electrotechnical Engineering after Previous Training IWT
Abridged Mechanical and Electrotechnical Engineering after Previous Training Physics

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