6 ECTS credits
150 h study time

Offer 1 with catalog number 6016809FNR for all students in the 1st semester at a (F) Master - specialised level.

Semester
1st semester
Enrollment based on exam contract
Impossible
Grading method
Grading (scale from 0 to 20)
Can retake in second session
Yes
Taught in
English
Topics
International Law
Comparative Law
Faculty
Faculty of Law and Criminology
Department
International and European Law
Educational team
Ricardo GOSALBO BONO (course titular)
Aurora VOICULESCU
Activities and contact hours
39 contact hours Lecture
Course Content

This course consists of two parts: international law and comparative law.

The aim of the Part 1 (International law) is to

·      Refresh students on the basic topics of international law, such as sources, international personality, territory, treaty law.

·      Explore the basis of international law as a discipline

·      Develop students’ knowledge and understanding of the rules and processes specific to IL

·      Set the foundation for incorporating aspects of both private and public international law

 

The aim of Part 2 (Comparative law)  is to offer a general introduction to the national foundations of the law of the European Union, with particular emphasis on the identification of the common concepts, elements and principles which inform the civil law and the common law traditions as the basis of an emerging new European ius commune. It also provides a legal comparison between European law and the non-European legal traditions such as the religious legal systems (Islamic, Jewish), the socialist legal systems, and traditional laws (Hindu law, the Far East laws, and African customary laws).

Additional info

For Part 1, the following materials will be used: 

- M.D.Evans – International Law (OUP, 2010)

- D.Harris – Cases and Materials on International Law (OUP, 2010)

Further readings may be indicated for each individual topic..

 

For Part 2, the students are  provided with two types of materials:

(i)       Theory: "Lessons on Comparative Law and Legal Traditions as Foundations of European Union Law" written and updated yearly by Prof. Ricardo Gosalbo Bono.

(ii)      Practice: Selective list of judgments, legislative acts and other legal instruments of the different legal systems of the world.

Learning Outcomes

General competencies

The learning outcome of Part 1 is that the student

·      Understands the sources and the subjects of international law

·      Understands the international law rules and processes

·      Is able to examines the scope and structure of international legal environments

·      Can identify and apply international legal principles to issues of global politics and justice

 

The learning outcome of Part 2 of the course is to broaden the strict horizons of national law, to provide the legal, conceptual and judicial bases of the European ius commune in comparison with the rest of the legal traditions of the world and to equip students and practitioners with those elements of the different legal systems which are at the core development of the law of the European Union, of uniform law and of international law.

Grading

The final grade is composed based on the following categories:
Oral Exam determines 50% of the final mark.
Written Exam determines 35% of the final mark.
Other Exam determines 15% of the final mark.

Within the Oral Exam category, the following assignments need to be completed:

  • Examen Mondeling with a relative weight of 1 which comprises 50% of the final mark.

Within the Written Exam category, the following assignments need to be completed:

  • Examen schriftelijk with a relative weight of 1 which comprises 35% of the final mark.

Within the Other Exam category, the following assignments need to be completed:

  • Examen Andere with a relative weight of 1 which comprises 15% of the final mark.

    Note: Presentation

Additional info regarding evaluation

The assessment of Part 1 is based on two components:

·       Presentation – collaborative and independent research work (30%)

·       Examination – closed book, 3 hours (70%).

 

Students are for Part 2 assessed in two ways:

(i)        Continuously at each course: students are requested to study each lesson in advance to the course; the latter focuses on questions raised by students and on the application of their knowledge to the resolution of a given case.

(ii)       A final oral examination which is centred on theoretical knowledge and its practical utility.

Academic context

This offer is part of the following study plans:
Master of Laws in International and European Law: Standaard traject